Daily Lectionary Podcast – Deuteronomy 25:17-26:19 and Matthew 17:1-13

Deuteronomy 25:17-26:19
Matthew 17:1-13
Tithes, direction of mission, and the 3rd use of the law
Getting the appearance of the Kingdom out of order – cross then glory, loss then restoration

Daily Lectionary Podcast – 2 Kings 6:1-23 and Philippians 1:21-2:11

2 Kings 6:1-23
Philippians 1:21-2:11
Surrounded by spiritual power
Power then humility vs. humility leading to Glory

Daily Lectionary Podcast – 1 Kings 7:51-8:21 and 2 Corinthians 3:1-18

1 Kings 7:51-8:21
2 Corinthians 3:1-18
Temple, Law, Glory and living fulfillment

Daily Lectionary Podcast – 1 Samuel 14:47-15:9 and Acts 24:24-25:15

1 Samuel 14:47-15:9
Acts 24:24-25:15
Saul’s lack of mercy, Mercy vs Usefulness, Paul’s appeal to Caesar – Was this a false step?

Citizenship Glory? – A Pentecost Confrontation

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Biblical Texts: Numbers 11:24-30, Acts 2:1-21 and John 7:37-39
Full Sermon Draft

There were several events that kicked off this sermon that are meaningful as Americans, but what Pentecost is a reminder of is that the City and the Unity we thirst for is not found in the Kingdoms of the world – those established by law. The City we long for is the City of God. The entrance to the City of God is Calvary which is the nullification of our self justifications our attempts to earn it. The citizenship we thirst for is only available by grace.

Here is the link to Carl Cannon’s article mentioned in the Sermon.

Daily Lectionary Podcast – Numbers 16:23-40 and Luke 19:29-48

Numbers 16:23-40
Luke 19:29-48
The great flip, the great and the least, the offering of Christ

Daily Lectionary Podcast – Leviticus 9:1-24 and Luke 9:18-36

Leviticus 9:1-24
Luke 9:18-36
Two appearances of glory, two acceptances of sacrifice, the gut level effect of pondering the animal sacrifice system

Seeing the Vision – Transfiguration Sunday

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Biblical Text: Matthew 17:1-9
Full Sermon Draft

The text is the transfiguration which is described as a vision. But it is a vision that ends with a strange warning – “say nothing until the Son of Man is risen from the dead”. The full vision is that God is present both in the glory and the cross. You can’t see it if you are only looking at on. Embedded in the sermon is a homily written by friend and fellow Pastor David Hess currently in hospice. Through his reflections and witness we get invite to “see” the vision.

Daily Lectionary Podcast – Ezekiel 40:1-4, 43:1-12 and Romans 8:18-39

Ezekiel 40:1-4, 43:1-12
Romans 8:18-39
Frustrated Glory, Swiftly Pass the Clouds of Glory (416)

Slight Momentary Diversions

Our organist, Dennis Hein, passed away this week from cancer. He was 64. The service is Saturday at 11 AM.

I’ve always had trouble turning off my brain. It is a cliche now, but a computer keeps cycling those giga-hertz even when 99% of them are spent running a screen saver and idling. When there are those things that come along that say “I’m going to take 100% of your cycles” and you can’t think of anything else, from hard experience that is where I tend to crash. Making sure there are slight momentary diversions is what re-introduces you to life. The daily routine prevents the crash.

This David Brooks article was fascinating. He might not like this, but Brooks is a top flight public theologian. I have a tough time thinking of anyone else who applies theology as deeply and as simply. From the article on the problem of Jeremy Lin:

The odds are that Lin will never figure it out because the two moral universes are not reconcilable. Our best teacher on these matters is Joseph Soloveitchik, the great Jewish theologian. In his essays “The Lonely Man of Faith” and “Majesty and Humility” he argues that people have two natures. First, there is “Adam the First,” the part of us that creates, discovers, competes and is involved in building the world. Then, there is “Adam the Second,” the spiritual individual who is awed and humbled by the universe as a spectator and a worshipper.

Soloveitchik plays off the text that humans are products of God’s breath and the dust of the earth, and these two natures have different moral qualities, which he calls the morality of majesty and the morality of humility. They exist in creative tension with each other and the religious person shuttles between them, feeling lonely and slightly out of place in both experiences.

Not to dispute that Rabbi Soloveitchik is a great teacher (he is), but those ideas are a little older than that. (I’m wondering if David Brooks is playing to his audience in the NYT?) St. Paul stated those thoughts in 1 Corinthians 15:47 and elsewhere. The Gospel according to Luke is at great pains to portray Jesus as the second Adam. And Luther’s Heidelberg disputation talks about the theologian of glory and the theologian of the cross. The morality of the athlete is that of glory. The morality that saves is that of the cross. The life of the disciple is running the race under the cross.