Tag Archives: Revolution

Reform without Repeal

This is Ross Douthat starting with the March for Life, but quickly getting deeply wise and insightful real fast.

I tried to find an excerpt, but its a short op-ed to begin with. Each phrased seems necessary. This is just the conclusion…

For its part, if the pro-life movement wants not only to endure but to triumph, then it needs an answer to this argument. That means something more than just a defense of a universal right to life. It means a realist’s explanation of how, in policy and culture, the feminist revolution could be reformed without being repealed.

He’s right, and this is a call from a practicing Roman Catholic to recognize a couple of things about civil society. However much ongoing harm the sexual revolution has done, repealing it in civil society is not possible, and some portions of it none of us would want to repeal (I’m thinking the equal pay portions and the access to occupations). As Mr. Douthat starts his column, the heroic generation of this cause is passing away. Heroic generations are revolutionaries or in this case counter-revolutionaries. Our generation is about recognizing the limits of revolution. That doesn’t mean making peace with it, but it does mean being smart and finding the places where life can win and start being seen as legitimate reformers instead of calling for the whole structure to be removed by the axe at the root of the tree.

Say you want a revolution…

Sermon Texts: Isaiah 45:1-7 and Matthew 22:15-22
Full Text of Sermon

First, I love it when the Children’s Choir signs. You can hear them on the Podcast well directed and taught by Mrs. Kristin Bayer who is a wonderful sax player and teacher. (I hope she doesn’t mind the plug.) The simplicity of the songs they sing makes worship and sermon themes very easy to construct. Someone has already done the hard work of distilling a biblical message to a child’s level – I get to piggy back it. And this Sunday had the serendipity to have lectionary texts very easily meshed.

Second, the Lordship of Jesus is something that Reformed usually do better having a strong Sovereignty of God theology. But even they take it in a different direction normally than I think the New Testament does. When most theologians start talking Sovereignty of God it is usually about election or salvation. Everything gets bent to a salvation theology. Not wrong, just not the entire story. The old and new testaments teach that God is actively involved in the world for the benefit of his people. He is not some distant deity. He is not some pull in case of emergency God or a galactic vending machine. He (typically) operates through means – like Cyrus, King of Kings of the Persian empire, or Pilate, Prefect of Judea or you and me wherever we might be.

That gets to that radical nature of “give to Caesar what is Caesar’s and give to God what is God’s.” The authority is God’s duly appointed. She is there for a reason. The authority should also recognize they are not an authority grounded in themselves. There is a Sovereign, an active one. All authority is accountable in the Kingdom of Heaven. That is why when the Beatles sing “everything’s gonna be alright” we don’t just tune it out as Pollyanna drivel. Everything’s gonna be alright, because He’s go the whole world in his hands.