Tag Archives: Matthew 3

Though the Chaos, Life

Biblical Text: Matthew 3:13-17, (Romans 6:1-11)

The Sunday after the Epiphany for us is always the Baptism of the Lord. And it is an incredibly rich text. Off the top of my head I can think of five “topics” that are justifiable to preach on from it. Looking at the sermon file I had done most of them over the past 11 years. The one that might be the most apparent, but is actually tougher is Jesus’ Baptism connected to our Baptism. Now you can just say Baptism and elide the difference, but if you do that you miss what this theophany in the Jordan tells us about God. Because Jesus baptism is not like ours. As Luther says in his Baptismal Liturgy prayer, it is by His baptism that all waters have become a blessed flood. We get Jesus’ baptism, because God stood with us and took ours. We get brought through the chaos to life, because he defeated death.

What are You Preparing For?

Biblical Text: Matthew 3:1-12

The Baptist calls Israel back to their core beliefs.  God will come down and redeem us.  We are not enough in ourselves, but the Lord fights for us.  And this God is a creator God, and a re-creator.  When God comes down and establishes his reign, he is not limited to what he finds.  He shall create all things new.  And so what we – what Israel – can do is prepare.  We can prepare the way of the Lord.  We can make his paths straight.  What does that mean?  It does not mean that we build the Kingdom.  Neither does it mean we melt away into the Kingdoms of the World.  What it mean is that we believe.  We repent of where we have gone wrong.  And we bear the fruits of that repentance.  Christ has delivered us from sin, and the power of the devil.  And he will deliver us from death.  We prepare to re-cross that Jordan.

Freedom to Become

Biblical Text: Matthew 3:13-17, Romans 6:1-11
Full Sermon Draft

I think I mentioned that because Christmas was a Sunday there are a bunch of small feast days that end up on the calendar. Today was another, the Baptism of Jesus. These days might seem extraneous, but with a little reflection are often quite deep and meaningful. The baptism of Jesus is connected to our baptism. Because he stood under those waters for us, we receive his baptism of grace. He took our unrighteousness and gives us his righteousness. This sermon meditates on a slightly different theme supported by the Epistle lesson. When we have been buried with Christ in baptism and raised to new life – freedom – what is the quality of that freedom. Are we made free to do whatever we want? As Paul answers, by no means. The freedom that Jesus displays is not the freedom to do what he wants but the freedom to become what we are. In Jesus’ case he is the Son of the Father and the savior of mankind. Was Jesus at liberty to proceed right to the fire? Well, he could have, but that would not have been freedom because it was less than Jesus was to be. We also, through our baptism, are free to become Children of God. We are freed from our fear of death and our bondage to sin, free to live as God intended. And we do this by faith. The sermon investigates